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Born in 1920, Federico Fellini is recognised as one of the greatest filmmakers of all time. Throughout the 1940s, the young filmmaker amassed many writing credits, most notably co-writing the screenplay for Rome, Open City, directed by Roberto Rossellini. This, famously, led Fellini to receive his first Oscar nomination. 
By 1950, Fellini had co-produced and co-directed his first feature film, Variety Lights, with Alberto Lattuada. Despite the film’s disastrous reception, Fellini continued making movies, and his 1953 effort, I Vitelloni, was recieved well and won the Silver Lion Award in Venice. 
Over the next few decades, Fellini created countless influential and breathtaking features with a distinctive style that cemented him as an auteur. Greatly inspired by his own childhood, dreams, and personal experiences, Fellini injected his films with warmth and humanity. He once declared: “Even if I set out to make a film about a fillet of sole, it would be about me.”
From  to La Dolce Vita, beautiful Italian locations play a central part in his films. Here are some essential locations featured in his movies, perfect for any Fellini fan to visit. 
Rome’s famous amphitheatre, The Colosseum, dates back to 80AD and still remains the largest standing amphitheatre in the world. The iconic landmark is rich with history, so it’s no surprise that Fellini chose The Colosseum as a filming location. 
It is featured in Lo sceicco bianco, Fellini’s first solo feature film, and it also forms the backdrop of a motorcycle race at the beginning of Roma, released 20 years later. Apparently, the director used to love feeding the stray cats that wandered around the monument while filming. 
You can find Fregene Beach just outside of Rome, about 30km away. Host to some of the best free beaches and bars outside of the Italian capital, Fregene is a popular destination for Rome natives. 
Although Fellini wasn’t born in Rome, the director had a particular fondness for the beach and owned a (now demolished) villa in the coastal town. Fregene Beach appears during La Dolci Vita‘s final scene, but it is also present in Lo Sceicco Bianco and Juliet of the Spirits
A must-see location for Fellini fans is the Trevi Fountain, the largest Baroque-style fountain in the city and one of the most famous fountains in the world. The landmark has been featured in classics such as Roman Holiday and Three Coins in the Fountain. However, one of the most recognisable scenes to feature the fountain is from La Dolce Vita
Slyvia and Marcello wade into the water together in the film’s most iconic scene, which is cemented into the brains of all Fellini fans. Unfortunately, the fountain is almost always teaming with tourists, so it might be challenging to view the landmark through the same lens that Fellini did. 
Fellini frequently included baths in his films, such as 8½. However, present in both La Dolce Vita and Le notte di Cabiria is the Baths of Caracalla. They were the city’s second-largest public baths, likely to have been built between AD 212 and 217. 
Although the baths stopped being used in the 530s, they can still be visited today and attract plenty of tourists every year. They were even used as a gymnastics venue during the 1960 Summer Olympics and sometimes host live music. 
The filmmaker lived on a street called Via Margutta just by Piazza del Popolo, a large urban square. Fellini often visited the square, stopping for coffee at the Canova café. Today, there is a gallery inside Canova that displays photos of Fellini alongside some of his paintings and sketches. 
Piazza del Popolo features in La Dolce Vita. It is here that Marcello and Maddalena pick up a prostitute before taking her back to the latter’s home to make love. 
In the 1950s, the street of Via Veneto attracted prominent Hollywood names, perhaps due to its close proximity to the US embassy. Stars such as Ingrid Bergman, Elizabeth Taylor and Kim Novak would frequent the expensive street to drink and party, which attracted lots of paparazzi. 
Fellini dramatised such events in La Dolce Vita. The street also appears in Le notti di Cabiria, which starred the director’s wife, Giulietta Masina, as a prostitute that searches Rome in the hopes of finding true love. 
Finally, a stop at Cinecittà Film Studios is the perfect place for hardcore Fellini fans. The studios were established during Mussolini’s fascist regime in an attempt to revive Italian cinema. Now, Cinecittà is the largest studio in Europe and has hosted the filming of over 3,000 films, 47 of which have been Oscar-winning. 
Not only did Fellini shoot most of his films here, but the studios have been used to shoot plenty of international productions. Filmmakers from Francis Ford Coppola to Martin Scorsese to Sergio Leone have created films here. 
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