A ski break in Italy this year will be more expensive as resorts struggle to offset spiking energy … [+] prices.
Mountain ski resorts across Italy have been increasing their prices in preparation for the winter season as soaring energy costs bite. Some centers have even chosen not to open at all as they face skyrocketing bills. If you’re considering booking a winter break in Italy, here’s what you need to know.
This year, a ski break in Italy will be more expensive as resorts struggle to offset spiking energy prices.
Operators have announced increases in the price of ski passes to account for the rising electricity bill from ski lifts. Costs of daily, multi-day and season passes have risen between 6% and 13%, according to news outlet SkyTG24. Across the country, there has been an average increase of 10%.
The consumer rights association Assoutenti has estimated that for ski passes, lodging, restaurants and other services, a week-long ski break will cost vacationers between €1400 and €1600, excluding transport.
The ski slopes of Bormio and Livigno in Valtellina have upped prices the most. In Bormio, a day pass will cost €52 this year, up from €46 last season, while in Livigno it has increased from €52 to €59.
In the popular resort of Courmayeur in Valle d’Aosta, a day pass will rise from €56 to €61, while La Thuile will increase from €47 to €51.
For the Dolomiti Superski day pass, which grants access to 12 different resorts scattered across the Dolomites mountain range, skiers will have to fork out €74 in high season, compared to €67 last year.
Restaurants, bars and hotels have also said their prices will rise to offset gas and electricity costs.
One area not hiking up prices this season is the north-easterly region of Friuli Venezia Giulia. The six ski slopes will maintain their €39.50 day pass and €215 weekly pass for the whole season.
Monterosa, which lies on the border between Valle d’Aosta and Piedmont, will also not increase the price of its €60 day pass.
For families, Livigno is offering free ski passes for those staying at least four nights in a hotel or seven in an apartment from 3-17 December 2022 and 15 April to 1 May 2023.
Other resorts are attempting to slow the rising costs with reduced opening hours. This includes only opening on certain days, opening for limited hours a day or only allowing access to the most popular slopes.

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